Universalism in Public Service Media

RIPE@2019
Edited by Philip Savage, Mercedes Medina, Gregory Ferrell Lowe
Published by Nordicom

Since the start of telephony and later in broadcasting, the pursuit of universal service has legitimated the ownership and operation of media as a public trust.
RIPE@2019 book cover. Nordicom

Until the 1980s, this principle was the bedrock for the broadcasting mission and is still a mandated requirement for public media companies today. But in practice, the universalism ideal was largely abandoned in the 1980s as media deregulation promised more competition,

innovation, and vigorous economic growth. Some of this came true, but at a worrisome cost. Growing distrust in media today is partly rooted in the illusion that more media in more platforms would inevitably ensure better media in all platforms. There is now more of everything on offer except social responsibility. This collection interrogates the historic universalism mission in public service broadcasting and explores its contemporary relevance for public service media. Taking a critical perspective on media policy and performance, the volume contributes to a much-needed contemporary reassessment that clarifies the importance of universalism for equity in access and provision, trustworthy content, and inclusive participation in the context of advancing digitalisation and globalisation. The collection situates universalism as an aspirational quest and inspirational pursuit. Researchers and policy makers will find the collection valuable for conceptualisation and strategic managers will find it helpful as a principled basis in the pursuit of improved reach and value.

(Text sourced via RIPE & Nordicom)Go to book

Achieving Viability for Public Service Media in Challenging Settings

A Holistic Approach
James Deane, Pierre François Docquir, Winston Mano, Tarik Sabry, Naomi Sakr

Part of the CAMRI Policy Briefs series.

Multiple international organisations recognise the value of public service media (PSM) as an essential component of democratisation. Yet how can PSM achieve viability in settings where models of media independence and credibility are unfamiliar or rejected by political leaders? This Policy

Brief considers the issues, research and policy options around achieving viability for PSM. It concludes with six recommendations that are relevant to policymakers, practitioners and media studies specialistsGo to publication

A Future for Public Service Television

Book: A Future for Public Service Television

Edited by Des Freedman and Vana Galdot

Goldsmiths Press

Television is on the verge of both decline and rebirth. Vast technological change has brought about financial uncertainty as well as new creative possibilities for producers, distributors and viewers. This volume examines not only the unexpected resilience of TV

as cultural pastime and aesthetic practice but also the prospects for public service television in a digital, multichannel ecology.

The proliferation of platforms from Amazon and Netflix to YouTube and the vlogosphere means intense competition for audiences traditionally dominated by legacy broadcasters. Public service broadcasters – whether the BBC, the German ARD, or the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation – are particularly vulnerable to this volatility. Born in the more stable political and cultural conditions of the twentieth century, they face a range of pressures on their revenue, their remits and indeed their very futures. This book reflects on the issues raised in Lord Puttnam’s 2016 Public Service TV Inquiry Report, with contributions from leading broadcasters, academics and regulators. With resonance for students, professionals and consumers with a stake in British media, it serves both as historical record and as a look at the future of television in an on-demand age.

Contributors include

Tess Alps, Patrick Barwise, James Bennett, Georgina Born, Natasha Cox, Gunn Enli, Des Freedman, Vana Goblot, David Hendy, Jennifer Holt, Amanda D. Lotz, Sarita Malik, Matthew Powers, Lord Puttnam, Trine Syvertsen, Jon Thoday, Mark Thompson

About the Editors

Des Freedman is Professor of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is project lead for the Inquiry into the Future of Public Service Television.

Vana Goblot teaches media and communications at Goldsmiths, University of London and is a research associate on the Inquiry. Her PhD examined questions of quality, cultural value and archival processes in relation to BBC4.


Text sourced from Goldsmiths PressMore info and Buy

Ripe 2013: The Value of Public Service Media

The sixth publication in the series of RIPE Readers on PSM published by NORDICOM

Editors: Gregory Ferrell Lowe & Fiona Martin

2013


Overview

With public service media under increasing scrutiny by governments and media markets alike, this reader contains a selection of chapters which investigate the diverse conceptions of public service value in media, keyed to distinctions in the values and ideals that legitimate media as

a public service in many countries.

Chapters include ‘Comparing Public Value as a Media Policy Term in Europe’, ‘Disaster Coverage and Public Value from Below’ and ‘ A Market Failure Perspective on Value Creation in PSM’ as well as many others.

To access the full publication, click here.