UNDER PRESSURE: WHY PUBLIC MEDIA MATTERS

The PUBLIC MEDIA ALLIANCE will host a session at the inaugural global conference for Media Freedom, co-hosted by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs.

With media freedom in decline worldwide, there has never been a more urgent need to promote the core values of public media and its role in underpinning democracy. The PMA session will feature key speakers from the world of public media debating its importance to society and media freedom as well as the contemporary challenges it faces around the globe.

When: 11-12:20, Wednesday 10th July 2019

Venue: Printworks, Canada Water, London

To attend this event please email your full name, organisation and position to info@publicmediaalliance.org so that they can apply for accreditation on your behalf.

More information, here.

EBU TRUST IN MEDIA 2019 RESEARCH

“The more national PSM are perceived to be free from political pressure, the higher the level of press freedom in a country.” – David Fernandez Quijada, Manager of the EBU’s Media Intelligence Service 

The question about trust and the media in democratic societies is perhaps more pertinent than ever.

It has been argued that today, trust and authority of the media are at stake, due to a perfect storm of related phenomena. As societies, and individuals, we have witnessed a shift in our relationship with knowledge; that is, common ideas of objectivity and “truth” are not prominent in public debates. Deep dissatisfaction in existing political actors, systems, and structures is coupled with fierce competition in media markets. Technological advances have fostered fragmentation among media publics and created information habits based on algorithms and micro-segmenting. Viral content sharing online has become a distribution vehicle of targeted propaganda and disinformation. Consequently, there exists an increasing distrust in elites and institutions, whether political or journalistic.

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) has studied trust in media in Europe and created a Net Trust Index, based on Eurobarometers and Reuters Digital News research. The results highlight the diminishing trust in social media and confirm the central role of public service media as a trusted source in Europe:

TRUST GAP BETWEEN BROADCAST AND ONLINE MEDIA

Broadcast media are the most trusted media throughout Europe. Radio is trusted in
85% of European countries, TV in 75%. Trust in online media is in constant decline,
with social networks being the least trusted media in 88% of European countries.

LOW POLITICAL PRESSURE ON PSM MEANS MORE FREEDOM OF THE PRESS

The more national PSM are perceived to be free from political pressure, the higher
the level of press freedom in a country. Thus, independent PSM are key for a free
and uncensored media landscape.

MORE TRUSTWORTHY NEWS MEANS MORE SATISFACTION WITH DEMOCRACY

A positive correlation between the perceived trustworthiness of national news and
citizen’s satisfaction with democracy makes radio and TV indispensable assets for
European societies.

HIGH TRUST IN PSM NEWS

PSM are among the most trusted news brands in more than 80% of European
markets. In more than 60% of the markets, PSM is the number 1 brand for trusted
news.

Read more, and sign up to download the report here.

COMMUNICATION RIGHTS IN THE DIGITAL AGE: CONFERENCE

Communication Rights in the Digital Age: Conference

WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PUBLIC SERVICE MEDIA IN PROMOTING AND SUPPORTING CITIZEN’S COMMUNICATION RIGHTS?

JOIN US TO DISCUSS:

COM­MU­NIC­A­TION RIGHTS IN THE DIGITAL AGE

24–25 OCTOBER 2019, HELSINKI, FINLAND

International Conference Organized by the Helsinki Media Policy Research Group at the University of Helsinki, the ECREA Communication Law and Policy Section and the Euromedia Research Group, and supported by the IAMCR Communication Policy & Technology Section.

The rights-based perspective on ethical and political questions presented by the new digital media has recently regained attention in academic and political debates. The formulation of human rights, in general, is based on a communication right – freedom of expression – as well as a right to take part and be heard in dialogue. In the digital era, the role of communication has been magnified.

Calls for the protection of citizens’ “digital rights,” for example, have resulted in countless reports and declarations by governments, international bodies, and activist organizations over the past two decades. In addition to debates on the consequences of digital transformations for established rights, such as freedom of expression, new rights have been envisioned, such as “the right to be forgotten” and the right to internet access.

Thus far, there are more academic, public and policy debates than solid and sustainable legal and policy solutions. This is not surprising given the complexity of these rights, which have many context-based variations, operate on the cusp of theory and praxis, and are constantly evolving with technological advances. Communication rights refer not only to legal norms but also more broadly to the freedoms and norms that have special significance to societies and individuals.

Due to the importance of communication rights to societies and democracy, it is imperative to understand how those rights are defined, manifested, regulated and monitored today. The realization of communication rights is further shaped by economic, political and socio-cultural situations. What do we know about these contexts? How can we accumulate a better conceptual and empirical understanding of communication rights?

This conference will specifically address the interplay of national and global, universal and specific,  characteristics of communication rights. Core questions include but are not limited to the following:

  • What are some definitions of communication rights?

– What should be considered communication rights?

– What is their relationship to human rights and/or natural rights?

– How do communication rights differ from the classic reliance on speech rights as the basis for media regulation?

  •  Who are the policy and other actors defining these rights in national and international contexts, and what are their roles in discursive and/or policy-making contexts?

– How do different academic disciplines respond to the concept of communication rights?

– How are rights interpreted in different empirical contexts?

– For instance, communication rights and their position in national constitutions

  •  What are the current core issues or cases that pertain to communication rights? These may include but are not limited to

– Market concentration, platforms and “big tech”: EU and national responses (for instance, platforms financing media and their influence on journalism)

– New policies for diversity; new tools and policies for media support and sustainability (for instance, media flows, cultural diversity and new policy tools, such as the Netflix tax, or old policy tools, such as quotas)

– The influence of party politics and populism (and the context of hate speech) on freedom of speech

– Increasing state control of media outlets, including public broadcasters

PMR Community : MAY IN REVIEW

PMR Community: May in Review

#ICYMI, HERE ARE SOME HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR FACEBOOK CONVERSATIONS AND SHARES IN MAY:

  • The EBU published a report by Tim Raats about collaborations and PSM. This is an excellent text that looks at the reasons for collaboration, categorizes them and looks into their key success factors.  The report can be downloaded here (you need to create a login).
  • Maria Michalis submitted written evidence to the House of Lords inquiry into public service broadcasting in the age of video on demand (UK) has now been published. She explained the continuing significance of public service broadcasting and put forward options to address prominence and funding challenges. The suggestions draw on the revised EU policy framework and practices in other European countries. Please find her text here.
  • Marko Milosavljevic shared his insights on the Stigler Center conference on Anti-trust and competition policy and media. “Francis Fukuyama praised public broadcasting as a source of knowledge and better democracy.” Screen the conference here:
  • Public Media Alliance reported on the collaborative editorial guidelines for news reporting the trial of Brenton Tarrant, the man charged with committing the 15 March terrorist attacks in Christchurch.  The guidelines were developed by New Zealand’s Media Freedom Committee – a group of senior editors representing major outlets Radio New Zealand (RNZ), TV New Zealand (TVNZ) Mediaworks, Stuff and New Zealand Media & Entertainment (NZME). Read the story here.